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Since June 2012, under the Occupational Pension Schemes (Disclosure of Information) Regulations 2006, trustees of schemes which are subject to the statutory funding standard are required to submit an Annual Actuarial Data Return each year. Details of the Return are set out in the Disclosure Regulations which must be completed by the scheme actuary and submitted to the Pensions Authority within 9 months of the end of the scheme year.

In the period up to 31 March 2016, the Pensions Authority received 699 Returns and has now published a summary of the information. A copy of the summary is available here. Points of particular interest include:

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What is the Omega Pharma case?

The Omega Pharma case has confirmed that the scheme’s governing documentation and not the Pensions Act minimum funding standard determine the employer’s liability to contribute to defined benefit schemes on wind-up.

On 25 July 2014, Mr Justice Moriarty in the Commercial Court handed down judgment in the case of Holloway & Ors v Damianus BV & Ors [2014] IEHC 383 and found in favour of the trustees of the Omega Pharma defined benefit scheme in their claim for deficit contributions against the scheme’s employers. The trustees succeeded in obtaining judgment in the amount of €2,439,193.56 (inclusive of interest) against the employers. On appeal, the newly established Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment in favour of the trustees (Holloway & ors -v- Damianus BV & ors [2015] IECA 19).

If the Element Six case (Greene & Ors v Coady & Ors [2014] IEHC 38) was the most important pensions law case for trustees in the recent past, the Omega Pharma case was not far behind. The Omega Pharma case is also particularly relevant to employers who operate or participate in defined benefit schemes. However, a number of key issues remain unanswered.

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Two liability management options we are seeing considered more and more frequently by Irish sponsoring employers of defined benefit schemes are pension increase exchange exercises (where members agree to forego an entitlement to increases on their pensions in the future in return for something now, for example, a higher starting flat pension) and transfer out exercises (where members agree to an enhanced transfer value in lieu of a future pension promise and transfer out of the scheme).

The rationale for these types of exercises is that liabilities are crystallised at the inducement date and risk of future adverse experience (for example, higher index-linked increases than estimated or adverse investment experience) are eliminated from the scheme.  An enhanced transfer value will usually be more than the statutory minimum funding standard but less than the equivalent of the cost of buying out the pension with a deferred annuity.  The funding position of the scheme and financial position and prospects of the sponsoring employer will drive this.  A key risk, of course, is that members do not fully understand what they are being asked to give up and seek to challenge the inducement exercise in the future.


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We are increasingly asked by overseas clients whether, if they acquire a business or a company in Ireland which operates a DB Scheme in Ireland, they could be liable to the DB Scheme even though the acquirer may not participate in that scheme.  UK clients are particularly concerned by this issue given their experiences with the UK pensions regulatory framework.
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