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Data protection rules already apply to the trustees of pension schemes as a result of the Data Protection Acts 1988 and 2003. The existing data protection legal framework will be significantly strengthened from 25 May 2018 when the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force. If trustees have not already started to consider whether their scheme arrangements will be compliant with GDPR requirements, now is the time to do so.

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The Minister for Social Protection, Leo Varadkar, has this week published the General Scheme of the Social Welfare and Pensions Bill 2017. The General Scheme is an initial draft of a bill which is then subject to pre-legislative scrutiny before being finalised. While in the normal course it could take some months for a General Scheme to be reviewed and scrutinized, the Minister has indicated that he intends for the final bill to be enacted before the Dáil breaks for Summer Recess (normally towards the end of July).

Key points:

  • Sponsoring employers to be required to give 12 months’ notice before ceasing contributions to defined benefit pension schemes and to continue paying contributions to the scheme during that period;
  • Employers of schemes which do not satisfy the minimum funding standard / funding standard reserve, to be required to enter into funding negotiations with the trustees;
  • Proposed power for the Pensions Authority to impose contribution obligation on sponsoring employers; and
  • Extension of spouse’s pensions to civil partners and same-sex spouses in certain circumstances.


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We have previously commented on legislation introduced as part of the process to amalgamate the offices of the Financial Services Ombudsman and the Pensions Ombudsman (see post of 27 May 2016 below). The decision to amalgamate the offices was made by the Government in 2013 following a recommendation from the OECD. Two draft bills (The

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It is not clear that there will be any immediate significant legal implications for Irish occupational pension schemes of the UK exiting the EU. However, the effect on the investment market and the continued uncertainty around Brexit is likely to have more immediate and significant consequences for Irish defined benefit schemes and their sponsoring employers.

Many Irish defined benefit schemes are struggling with funding proposals that have gone off or may go off track as a result of poor market conditions. In addition, funding difficulties (and their associated impact on IAS liabilities of sponsoring employers) may trigger fresh scheme reviews and renewed focus on liability (and volatility) management.

Trustees and sponsors will need to consider with their investment and actuarial advisers what can be done to mitigate the risk of continued poor market performance in light of ongoing uncertainty during the proposed transition period. As required by the Pension Authority’s financial management guidelines, an important step will be identifying the main risks schemes are exposed to and what contingency plans can be put in place to reduce any negative impact. A general review of the scheme investment strategy and investment options may also be warranted.

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Since June 2012, under the Occupational Pension Schemes (Disclosure of Information) Regulations 2006, trustees of schemes which are subject to the statutory funding standard are required to submit an Annual Actuarial Data Return each year. Details of the Return are set out in the Disclosure Regulations which must be completed by the scheme actuary and submitted to the Pensions Authority within 9 months of the end of the scheme year.

In the period up to 31 March 2016, the Pensions Authority received 699 Returns and has now published a summary of the information. A copy of the summary is available here. Points of particular interest include:

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Statutory Instrument No.229 of 2016, signed by the Minister for Social Protection on 5 May, represents another step towards the amalgamation of the offices of the Financial Services Ombudsman and the Pensions Ombudsman. The Government made the decision to merge the two agencies in May 2013, after a recommendation from the OECD.
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At the Irish Association of Pension Funds Annual Investment Conference held last week, Brendan Kennedy, the Pensions Regulator, reiterated the Pensions Authority’s continued focus on good governance and its plans for ramping up the Authority’s programme of engagement with trustees of defined benefit schemes. This engagement includes continuing to invite such trustees to meet with

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What is the Omega Pharma case?

The Omega Pharma case has confirmed that the scheme’s governing documentation and not the Pensions Act minimum funding standard determine the employer’s liability to contribute to defined benefit schemes on wind-up.

On 25 July 2014, Mr Justice Moriarty in the Commercial Court handed down judgment in the case of Holloway & Ors v Damianus BV & Ors [2014] IEHC 383 and found in favour of the trustees of the Omega Pharma defined benefit scheme in their claim for deficit contributions against the scheme’s employers. The trustees succeeded in obtaining judgment in the amount of €2,439,193.56 (inclusive of interest) against the employers. On appeal, the newly established Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment in favour of the trustees (Holloway & ors -v- Damianus BV & ors [2015] IECA 19).

If the Element Six case (Greene & Ors v Coady & Ors [2014] IEHC 38) was the most important pensions law case for trustees in the recent past, the Omega Pharma case was not far behind. The Omega Pharma case is also particularly relevant to employers who operate or participate in defined benefit schemes. However, a number of key issues remain unanswered.

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The position relating to pensions on bankruptcy has not always been entirely clear. Currently, in order for a pension scheme to qualify for Revenue approval, a pension under the scheme cannot be assigned or surrendered, save in certain limited circumstances. As a result, pension schemes often contain wording prohibiting assignment or surrender and, in certain cases, providing for the forfeiture of the benefit on a member’s bankruptcy. This in turn raised the question of whether or not a pension (not yet in payment) was capable of vesting in the Official Assignee in bankruptcy as part of the debtor’s property.

Part 4 of the Personal Insolvency Act 2012 which was commenced at the end of last year has introduced two new provisions into the Bankruptcy Act 1988 specifically relating to pensions on bankruptcy. Section 44A of the Bankruptcy Act now provides that assets under a relevant pension arrangement (other than payments already received or which the bankrupt was entitled to receive) shall not vest in the Official Assignee. A relevant pension arrangement is defined in the section and includes a retirement benefits scheme, retirement annuity contract, PRSA, overseas pension plan etc.


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