It is not clear that there will be any immediate significant legal implications for Irish occupational pension schemes of the UK exiting the EU. However, the effect on the investment market and the continued uncertainty around Brexit is likely to have more immediate and significant consequences for Irish defined benefit schemes and their sponsoring employers.

Many Irish defined benefit schemes are struggling with funding proposals that have gone off or may go off track as a result of poor market conditions. In addition, funding difficulties (and their associated impact on IAS liabilities of sponsoring employers) may trigger fresh scheme reviews and renewed focus on liability (and volatility) management.

Trustees and sponsors will need to consider with their investment and actuarial advisers what can be done to mitigate the risk of continued poor market performance in light of ongoing uncertainty during the proposed transition period. As required by the Pension Authority’s financial management guidelines, an important step will be identifying the main risks schemes are exposed to and what contingency plans can be put in place to reduce any negative impact. A general review of the scheme investment strategy and investment options may also be warranted.
Continue Reading Implications of Brexit for Irish Occupational Pension Schemes

Since 27 March 2013 members of pension schemes have been able to avail of a once-off early access option to additional voluntary contributions (AVCs) which they have made to their pension scheme. This option is provided for under section 782A of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997 (the 1997 Act) and allows members to withdraw up to a maximum of 30% of their AVC fund prior to retirement.

When the legislation was first introduced last year it was unclear whether it overrode the express provisions of a pension scheme’s trust deed and rules and, in particular, whether an amendment to a scheme’s trust deed and rules would be required before an individual could avail of such an option. While the Department of Finance clarified that the intention of the legislation was to permit trustees to act on an instruction from members without an amendment to the rules, it acknowledged that trustees would need to take their own legal advice and indicated that if the issue caused real uncertainty it would consider including an amendment to section 782A of the 1997 Act in the next Finance Bill.

The Department has now, by virtue of the Finance (No. 2) Act 2013, amended section 782A of the 1997 Act. This amendment is intended to allow a member avail of the early access option notwithstanding anything contained in the rules of a scheme. This amendment reinforces the legislative intent to allow trustees to act on an instruction without an amendment to the trust deed and rules. However, it does not address all legal issues arising for trustees when making a payment on foot of an instruction under section 782A.

In particular, the amendment to the legislation does not provide trustees of pension schemes with a discharge in respect of any AVCs withdrawn nor does it prescribe the form of instruction required.  In such circumstances, it may remain prudent for trustees to consider an amendment to the governing provisions of their scheme to deal with such issues where members are exercising their option to avail of early access to AVCs on foot of section 782A.

Continue Reading Finance (No. 2) Act 2013 – Early Access to AVCs and other provisions

The pension levy was introduced under a seemingly innocuous piece of legislation, the Finance (No.2) Act 2011. The Act, insofar as it provides for the levy, is just 10 pages long.  Less is more?  Not in this case. While the dust hasn’t quite settled on the financial impact of the levy on struggling pension schemes, practitioners are still struggling to get to grips with exactly what some of the more technical requirements under the legislation mean, and how they can be complied with. The primary problem practitioners are having in deciphering what is required under the legislation is a lack of clarity, loose drafting and, in some cases, seemingly superfluous wording.  In the case of the Finance (No.2) Act 2011, the Government would have been well-advised to follow the approach of “more is more”. 

Continue Reading Grappling with the Pensions Levy